PGI Installation and Licensing Questions


Which releases of PGI compilers work with each Linux distribution?

Each release of Linux changes many things, primarily the glibc libraries, the locations of files and headers for gcc, and changes to how executables are built. As a result, the PGI compiler install process has to adjust with each release, and the code shipped needs to be updated or expanded. Most compiler releases will be compatible with previous Linux versions existing at that time, though we do change the oldest release we support as the releases proceed.

Here are the PGI compiler releases and the versions of Linux they work with. Note, as is commonly done, we only update the most current release for a new version of Linux. The Linux version involved comes with a specific glibc and gcc version. If you use the versions that are bundled as part of the development tools for that Linux release, and they match another supported release below, then your installation will probably succeed. Not all versions of gcc/glibc can work with any Linux release/kernel, however, so any a custom combination of Linux with gcc tools and libs should not be too different from the bundled release.

Here is a table of the Releases available and how to bring them up to their most up-to-date version. Be sure to add any patches after the latest version is downloaded and installed.

Release Linux Releases Verified to Install Newest Version Notes
2016 32-bit and 64-bit: RHEL 5.3–7.2, SUSE 10.2–11.4, SLES 11/12 SP1,
openSUSE 11.1–Leap 4.21, Fedora 10–23, CentOS 5.11–7.1, Ubuntu 10.04–15.10
16.1 Release & version info
2015 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.8–7.0, SUSE 9.3–11.2, SLES 10/11 SP3,
openSUSE 10.2–13.2, Fedora 4–21, CentOS 5.2–7, Ubuntu 8.04–14.10
15.10 Release & version info
2014 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.0/5.0/5.3/6.0/6.2/6.3/6.5,
SUSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1/11.2,
SLES 9/10/11 SP1 & SP2, openSUSE 12.2, Fedora 4–20, CentOS 6.4,
Ubuntu 8/9/9.04/10.04/10.10/11.04/11.11/12.04/12.10/13.04/13.10
14.10 Release & version info
2013 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.0/5.0/5.3/6.0/6.2/6.3,
SUSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1/11.2,
SLES 9/10/11 SP1 & SP2, openSUSE 12.2, Fedora 4–17
Ubuntu 8/9/9.04/10.04/10.10/11.04/11.11/12.04/12.10
13.10 Release & version info
2012 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.0/5.0/5.3/6.0/6.2,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1,
SLES 9/10/11 SP1, Fedora 4–16,
Ubuntu 8/9/9.04/10.04/10.10/11.04/11.11
12.10 Release & version info
2011 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.0/5.0/5.3/6.0,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1,
SLES 9/10/11, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14,
Ubuntu 8/9/9.04/10.04/10.10/11.04
11.10 Release & version info
2010 32-bit and 64-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 4.0/5.0/5.3,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1,
SLES 9/10/11, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11, Ubuntu 8/9/9.04
10.9 Release & version info
9.0 32-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0/5.3,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3,
SLES 9/10/11, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11, Ubuntu 8/9
64-bit: SLES 9/10/11, SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3/11.0/11.1,
RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0/5.3, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11, Ubuntu 8/9
9.0-4 Release info
8.0 32-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0/5.3,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3,
SLES 9/10/11, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9, Ubuntu 8
64-bit: SLES 9/10/11, SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3,
RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0/5.3, Fedora 4/5/6/7/8/9, Ubuntu 8
8.0-6 Release info
7.2 32-bit: Red Hat 9.0, and RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0,
SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3,
SLES 9/10, Fedora Core 4/5/6/7/8
64-bit: SLES 9/10, SuSE 9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3/10.0/10.1/10.2/10.3,
RHEL 3.0/4.0/5.0, Fedora Core 4/5/6/7/8
7.2-5 Release info


Which releases of PGI compilers work with each Windows version?

PGI Workstation and PGI Server for Windows. Versions are added as they become available.

Release Windows Versions Verified to Install Newest Version Notes
2015 32-bit and 64-bit: 7/8/8.1/Server 2008 R2/Server 2012 15.10 Release & version info
2014 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/8/8.1/Server 2003/Server 2008/Server 2012
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/7/8/8.1/Server 2003 x64/Server 2008 R2/Server 2012
14.10 Release & version info
2013 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/8/Server 2003/Server 2008/Server 2012
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/7/8/Server 2003 x64/Server 2008 R2/Server 2012
13.10 Release & version info
2012 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/7/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/
HPC Server 2008 R2
12.10 Release & version info
2011 32-bit: XP/Vista/7*/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/
HPC Server 2008 R2
11.10 Release & version info
2010 32-bit: XP/Vista/7*/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/
HPC Server 2008
10.9 Release & version info
9.0 32-bit: XP/Vista/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/HPC Server 2008
9.0-4 Release info
8.0 32-bit: XP/Vista/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/HPC Server 2008
8.0-6 Release info
7.2 32-bit: 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server
7.2-5 Release info
*Note on Windows 7 compatibility: FLEXlm versions delivered with PGI 2010 and PGI 2011 releases were compatible with only the 32-bit versions of Windows 7. PGI 2012 and newer releases are compatible with both the 32-bit and the 64-bit versions of Windows 7.


Which releases of PGI Visual Fortran compilers work with each Windows version?

PGI Visual Fortran Workstation and Server for Windows. Versions are added as they become available.

Note: PVF is NOT compatible with Visual Studio Express. PVF will not install or run successfully on systems with VS Express present regardless of the VS Express version or PVF version.

Release Windows Versions Verified to Install Newest Version Notes
2015 32-bit and 64-bit: 7/8/8.1/Server 2008 R2/Server 2012
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (VS 2013 shell included), 2012, 2010 and 2008
15.10 Release & version info
2014 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/8/8.1/Server 2003/HPC Server 2008 R2/Server 2012
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/7/8/Server 2003 x64/HPC Server 2008 R2/Server 2012
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (VS 2013 shell included), 2012, 2010 and 2008
14.10 Release & version info
2013 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/8/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Vista/7/8/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/HPC Server 2008 R2
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 (VS 2012 shell included), 2010 and 2008
13.10 Release & version info
2012 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista/7/HPC Server 2008 R2
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 (VS 2010 shell included) and 2008
12.10 Release & version info
2011 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista/HPC Server 2008 R2
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 (VS 2010 shell included) and 2008
11.10 Release & version info
2010 32-bit: XP/Vista/7/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista/HPC Server 2008
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, 2008 (VS 2008 shell included) and 2005
10.9 Release & version info
9.0 32-bit: XP/Vista/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista/HPC Server 2008
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (VS 2008 shell included) and 2005
9.0-4 Release info
8.0 32-bit: XP/Vista/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista/HPC Server 2008
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (VS 2008 shell included) and 2005
8.0-6 Release info
7.2 32-bit: XP/Vista/Server 2003
64-bit: XP x64/Server 2003 x64/Compute Cluster Server/Vista
Supports Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 and 2005
7.2-5 Release info
See the note above on Windows 7 compatibility.

Can I install PVF on a platform with Visual Studio Express installed?

No. PVF will not install and run successfully on a system with Visual Studio Express installed. Even installing PVF with the VS 2010 shell onto a system with VS Express 2008 already installed will not work. You must first remove VS Express before installing PVF.


Which releases of PGI compilers work with each Apple OS X version on Intel-based Macs?

PGI Workstation and PGI Server for OS X. Versions are added as they become available.
Note: PGI compilers and tools are not supported on Macintosh computers with PowerPC processors.

Release Apple OS X Versions Verified to Install Newest Version Notes
2016 32-bit and 64-bit: 10.8 Mountain Lion/10.9 Mavericks/ 10.10 Yosemite/
10.11 El Capitan
16.1 Release & version info
2015 32-bit and 64-bit: OS X 10.7 Lion/10.8 Mountain Lion/10.9 Mavericks/
10.10 Yosemite
15.10 Release & version info
2014 32-bit: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion/10.8 Mountain Lion/10.9 Mavericks
64-bit: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion/10.8 Mountain Lion/10.9 Mavericks
14.10 Release & version info
2013 32-bit: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion/10.8 Mountain Lion
64-bit: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion/10.8 Mountain Lion
13.10 Release & version info
2012 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion
12.10 Release & version info
2011 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard/10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard/10.6 Snow Leopard/10.7 Lion
11.10 Release & version info
2010 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard/10.6 Snow Leopard
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard/10.6 Snow Leopard
10.9 Release & version info
9.0 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard/10.6 Snow Leopard
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard
9.0-4 Release info
8.0 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard
8.0-6 Release info
7.2 32-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard
64-bit: Mac OS X 10.4.9 Tiger/10.5 Leopard
7.2-5 Release info


Which versions of PGI Accelerator compilers support which CUDA Toolkit versions?

Applies to all PGI Accelartor products. New PGI versions are added when the CUDA Toolkit is updated.
Note: Default toolkit is displayed in bold.

Version Supported CUDA Toolkit Versions Support Operating Systems Release Notes
16.1 7.0, 7.5 64-bit Linux. 64-bit Windows 7 or newer. 64-bit OS X 10.9 or newer.
15.9 6.5, 7.0, 7.5 64-bit Linux. 64-bit Windows 7 or newer. 64-bit OS X 10.9 or newer.
32-bit Windows execution.
CUDA 7.0
15.4 5.5, 6.5, 7.0 64-bit Linux. 64-bit and 32-bit Windows 7 and newer.
64-bit OS X 10.8 and newer.
CUDA 6.5
15.1 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 64-bit and 32-bit Linux. 64-bit and 32-bit Windows XP and newer.
64-bit and 32-bit OS X 10.8 and newer.
14.9 6.0, 6.5 64-bit and 32-bit Linux. 64-bit and 32-bit Windows XP and newer.
64-bit and 32-bit OS X 10.8 and newer.
CUDA 6.0
14.4 5.5, 6.0 64-bit and 32-bit Linux.
64-bit and 32-bit Windows XP and newer; Server 2008 R2 and newer.
64-bit and 32-bit OS X 10.7.5 and newer.
CUDA 5.5
14.4 5.0, 5.5 64-bit and 32-bit Linux.
64-bit and 32-bit Windows XP and newer; Server 2008 R2 and newer.
64-bit and 32-bit OS X 10.7 and newer.
CUDA 5.0


What type of licenses are available?

There are six types of licenses keys provided with PGI compilers.

The first three license keys are temporary and in most cases work with any PGI release from version 7.2 newer. All PGI temporary licenses work with any PGI product running on any supported operating system.

All other license keys are permanent and perpetual—they never stop working with the PGI release version for which they were created. FlexNet-managed licenses also work with all earlier PGI release versions back to 7.2. Expect as noted below, all PGI permanent licenses are specific to individual PGI products running on a single operating system (e.g. PGI Accelerator Fortran/C/C++ Workstation for Linux).


Can you please give me an overview of a PGI license?

Here is a synopsis of a typical set of PGI license keys. It is broken down into sections, with important parts labeled. The dashed lines and (!) comments are added, and the parts in parantheses are optional.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
SERVER <license server hostname> 0123456789ab 27000        !SERVER line
------------------------------------------------------------------------
DAEMON pgroupd (/path/to/pgroupd) (PORT=port_number)       !DAEMON line
------------------------------------------------------------------------
PACKAGE PGI2015-<PGI PIN> pgroupd <subscription end date>  A13AB920D570 \
<…>
6167 7015 3F05 9C37 2315 ACDF 1B73 DAA9 FBAE"

The SERVER line has three components, the hostname of the license server, the hostid of the license server, and the PORT used by lmgrd to process the license requests. You can edit the hostname and PORT used (27000) by hand without regenerating the license.

The DAEMON line has three components, the name of the DAEMON used (pgroupd), the path to the daemon, if not where lmgrd is located (as in /usr/pgi/daemon/pgroupd) and a PORT which pgroupd would use to communicate.

The PORT used (27000 for lmgrd, not designated for pgroupd) can be any unused integer that the Operating System allows. We do not know how to tell which PORT numbers would be successful, but you can change them by hand in the license file.

The path to pgroupd can be added to a DAEMON line if you want to make sure the license service uses a particular DAEMON. Newer DAEMONs can read the newer license file formats, as well as the older ones.

The first line of the License section begins with PACKAGE, and has a date-formatted number like 2016.1231 in it. This number designates when the license subscription expires, and it also tells you with which releases the license will work. For this case, the license subscription expires on December 31 2016, and this means the license will work with current releases and future releases up to 16.12 release (if there is one). You do not need to update this license until after you renew your subscription late in 2016.


What are the most common license problems?

The most common license problems are:


What is the hostid?

On Windows, Linux, and OS X, the hostid is the Ethernet address (a/k/a MAC) of the network card that is configured. Older releases supported only device eth0 for FlexNet style licensing, but releases 9.0 and later support multiple configured network cards. If your license works with the current release, it should work with previous releases back to 7.2. Making the current release license work often requires the version of pgroupd be the one included with the current release.

Whichever license is used, the hostid used to create the PGI license must not change, or the license validation will fail.


How do I know if the license hostid has changed, and what should I do then?

The SERVER line of your license file has the form

SERVER hostname_of_the_license_server 001122334455 27000

In the above, 001122334455 is the hostid, and 27000 is the PORT used for lmgrd.

If you have a permanent license, run

lmutil lmhostid

in the Windows, Linux, or OS X environment. lmutil resides in the same directory as the PGI compilers.

See if any of the hostid values displayed agree with the one found in your license.dat file. There can be more than one displayed.

If the hostid has changed, then login to your account and create new license keys. If you don't have an account, you'll need to register first. The PIN Code used to tie the license PIN to your account can be found in the original PGI order confirmation you received at the time of purchase. If you do not have your order acknowledgment then please contact PGI License Support and request that your PIN(s) be tied to your account.


If the hostid has not changed and the license manager fails, what next?

Use the following checklist to eliminate the easy things. But first, run the following commands after the compilers have been installed and the environment set up. lmutil resides in the PGI bin directory.

lmutil lmhostid           ! obtain the hostids that are detected 
lmutil lmhostid -hostname ! obtain the hostname 
lmutil lmhostid -internet ! obtain the IPA of the hostname 

The following applies to FlexNet style node-locked and floating licenses only. Most problems with running license daemons are relatively minor although they may not seem like it at the time.


Okay, the simple things check out, what next?

Check the Flexera Software (Flexera publishes FlexNet Publisher) support center.


Who do I contact with license questions?

Email questions about your license status, how to generate new license keys, and how to get your original order acknowledgment to PGI License Support.


Where can I find my PIN?

When communicating with PGI, please provide your PIN (Product Identification Number) with your inquiry. Your PIN can be found in your license file. Typically the license file is found at $PGI/license.dat (Linux and Mac OS X) or C:\Program Files\PGI\license.dat (Windows). In the license.dat file, look for

VENDOR_STRING=xxxxxx 

where xxxxxx is a six digit number starting with a 1, 5 or 9. This is your PIN. If your file is not in $PGI, look at the location $PGROUPD_LICENSE_FILE.


How do I create/delete/move a license?

This question applies to those who have a paid license or a University Developer license. See below for information on deleting or moving trial licenses or Free PGI for OS X.

We recommend that you install the software first on the system you are using, or intend to move to, before trying to obtain a license for that system. If you are moving your compilers to a new system, DO NOT remove the compilers from your previous machine until things are working on your new system. Avoid leaving yourself with no working compilers in the event you have temporary license problem during the transfer.

Determine your PIN as described in the PIN FAQ above.

In early 2008, PGI changed its systems to accommodate a single login format of email_address/password to both download new software and generate a license for one or more PINs. Go to the account log in page to obtain downloads and new licenses.

If you cannot tie your PIN to your account, send mail to PGI License Support, and provide as much info as you know about the original purchase so we can search. Usually, the name or email address of the purchaser is enough. More info may be needed if you have multiple licenses at your site.

To create a license, you will need a hostid for the device that is managing the license. If you have a PGI Workstation or a PGI University Developer license, this is the hostid of the machine you installed the compilers on. If you have a PGI Server or PGI CDK license, it is the hostid of the license server.

To move a license from one machine to another, log in to your PGI account and click on the "Create Permanent Keys" link. Each PIN tied to your account is linked to the license generator. First, delete your current license and then create a new license using your new hostid. You may have to wait for PGI to approve your request if you move or delete your license more often than twice a year.

We appreciate the effort you have to go through to create or change a license, and we apologize for these extra steps needed to preserve the integrity of our software products.

If you have a trial license, these steps are not required. Simply delete the license file to remove it, or copy it to another system to move it. Free PGI for OS X does not use license keys. Reinstall the Free PGI software to move it to another machine.


Why can't I use my license server to serve more than one set of PGI license keys?

Users with multiple PGI products might like the convenience and efficiency of a single computer to serve floating license keys. Either by merging the license keys into a single file, or by adding them to the paths in $PGROUPD_LICENSE_FILE, they assume that the license server can handle two or more PGI products in much the way the server can handle one PGI product and (for example) a MATLAB product.

In a similar vein, users with more than one node-locked, single user product license, like PGI Workstation, also might like to run multiple license keys on the same license server, giving more than one user simultaneous access to PGI compilers and tools on that computer.

Unfortunately, neither of these cases are possible with the FlexNet Publisher software that PGI uses to manage software license keys.

A FlexNet Publisher license server consists of a master daemon, named lmgrd, and a number of vendor daemons. The PGI vendor daemon is named pgroupd. The master daemon coordinates the license key requests from users and routes these requests to the appropriate vendor daemon. The vendor daemon actually manages check-out and check-in requests for each managed product.

Once the vendor daemon finds a license key that matches the requested software components, no further processing is performed on the license key file. In other words, if there are multiple, equivalent PGI license keys in the license file, only one of those license keys will be served by the vendor daemon. The other license keys will not be recognized and will not be served.

Some customers try and run multiple instances of lmgrd on the same machine, with the intent of having each copy manage a unique set of PGI license keys. This will not work. FlexNet vendor daemons use a fixed-location in the shared filesystem as a lock file to insure that only one vendor daemon process can run on the license server computer.

In short, the rules are one PGI floating license key or PGI node-locked license key per license server. Following this rule will enable the total number of simultaneous users to be the maximum allowed by all the license keys served.


What do I do when lmutil lmhostid returns a blank?

PGI licenses use FlexNet licensing components to manage compiler licenses. Licenses are generated based upon the unique output on each host of the FlexNet command:

lmutil lmhostid

On Linux systems, this command returns the MAC address of the network cards configured. Older releases (pre 9.0) only returned hostids for net cards configured as eth0. This does not mean you have to be connected to the Internet, but it needs to be "visible" at runtime. For example, if you have root privilege and type ifconfig, you will see something like this:

ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:BE:FE:BE:EF:FD  
          inet addr:167.6.543.21  Bcast:167.1.234.456  Mask:255.255.254.0
          inet6 addr: beef::222:beef:feed:1234/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST NOTRAILERS RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:1234560 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0654321 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:7777 
          RX bytes:1212121212 (4321.0 Mb)  TX bytes:54321234 (567.8 Mb)
          Interrupt:123 

In this case, the output of lmutil lmhostid is '00befebeeffd'.

Three common causes for a missing or hidden eth0 MAC address are:

  1. Sites where Administrators do not configure a network card at eth0.
  2. Linux systems that drop eth0 when not connected to the Internet.
  3. Linux systems where the OS assigns the eth*, and the assignment moves after reboot.

Please check with your systems administrator or IT support group it you encounter this problem. Currently, PGI knows of no workaround if eth0 does not have a network card configured on older releases. Current releases should find all configured network cards.

Instead of setting up the first "found" card to eth0 at boot time, newer Linux distributions have a habit of "remembering" past mappings, and then incrementing the network device number. Or, they dynamically assign the device numbers to the network cards.

See www.artwork.com for a reasonable description of the problem along with a solution for Ubuntu Linux.


How do I use a Windows machine as a floating license server?

Even if you have a floating license for PGI's Linux only compilers, you can still use a 32-bit or 64-bit Microsoft Windows based machine as a license server. Node-locked licenses like the PGI Workstation product must use the machine running the compilers as the license server.

To use the machine as a license server, download and install the PGI Windows compilers in the default directory, C:\Program Files\PGI.

From the PGI Workstation command window, determine the hostid of the license server by typing lmutil lmhostid, and choosing one of the hostids to use when generating your license keys. The hostname can be found by typing uname -n in the PGI Workstation command window.

Copy your license keys into C:\Program Files\PGI\license.dat

Go to Start | Control Panel | Administrative Tools | Services, and select PGI License Server and start the license server. If it is already started, stop it and start it again, or type lmutil lmreread in the PGI Workstation command window.

On every machine that runs the compilers set the environment variable $PGROUPD_LICENSE_FILE to port@hostname. For example, with hostname "hal", export PGROUPD_LICENSE_FILE=27000@hal should work.

ssh hal 'date'


Why am I seeing the error '$PGI/linux86-64/16.*/bin/lmutil: No such file or directory'?

PGI Release 2016 compilers use versions of flexlm that require Linux Standard Base aka lsb be present. You can still use the flexlm software that came with Release 2011, but you will eventually need lsb installed on Linux.

The most common symptom of the problem will be a message when you run the compilers

$PGI/linux86-64/16.*/bin/lmutil: No such file or directory 

To determine if the problem is lsb, type

% lsb_release 

If it returns core-3.0 or higher, then you have lsb. If less than 3.0 or 'n/a' is returned, you need to install it, and then run the compilers.

For Ubuntu, the process is

%  apt-get install lsb

On other Linux versions, you need to install it from the RPM.

Recheck lmutil again and see if things work. If not, try reinstalling the PGI compilers.


Can I check-out one of our network floating licenses to use on the road?

Beginning with PGI Release 7.2, users with network floating license for PGI products can "borrow" a license to use when not connected the license server.

The following example illustrates using this feature under Linux. Operation under OSX and Windows is similar.

To borrow a pgfortran license, using today's date, do the following:

  1. In your shell, enter

    % lmborrow pgroupd 21-may-2015
    lmborrow - Copyright (c) 1989-2015 Acresso Software Inc. and/or
    Acresso Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
    Setting LM_BORROW=21-may-2015:pgroupd:21-may-2015
    
  2. Compile a prgram using pgfortran:

    % pgfortran hello.f
    

    A license to use pgfortran is now borrowed. You will need to repeat this process for each compiler and tool that you wish to borrow. Verify that you're borrowing licenses successfully.

    % lmborrow -status
    lmborrow - Copyright (c) 1989-2015 Acresso Software Inc. and/or
    Acresso Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
    Vendor     Feature                             Expiration
    ______     ________                            __________
    pgroupd    pgfortran-lin64                   21-May-15 23:59
    

    You can now disconnect from the network and use the compiler and tools that you checked out.

    If you wish to return the license before the expiration date, connect to your network and use the lmborrow -return command (see -help for the complete syntax). For example,

    % lmborrow -return pgfortran-lin64
    

    Again, verify that the license was returned using the lmborrow -status command:

    % lmborrow -status
    lmborrow - Copyright (c) 1989-2007 Acresso Software Inc. and/or
    Acresso Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
    

For a complete list of commands enter

% lmborrow -help
lmborrow - Copyright (c) 1989-2007 Acresso Software Inc. and/or
Acresso Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Usage:  lmborrow {all|vendorname} dd-mmm-yyyy [hh:mm]     (To borrow)
        lmborrow -status           (Report features borrowed to this node)
        lmborrow -clear            (Changed your mind -- do not borrow)
        lmborrow -return [-c licfile] [-d display_name] [-fqdn] feature
                                   (Return feature early)
        lmborrow -help             (Display usage information)

The syntax of the check out is:

lmborrow {all|vendorname} dd-mmm-yyyy [hh:mm]

Where all indicates all license vendors and vendorname indicates a specific vendor (e.g., pgroupd for PGI compilers/tools). dd-mmm-yyyy is the date that you anticipate returning the license and [hh:mm] is an optinal return time using 24 hour notation (i.e., 11pm is 23:00). By default the return time is 23:59.


How do I uninstall PGI software?

To remove a PGI installation from a Linux platform, simply remove the $PGI directory.

% cd /
% chmod -R a+w  $PGI; rm -rf $PGI

To remove a particular release from a $PGI directory where multiple PGI releases are installed, go down another directory level, and remove the desired installation directory. This example removes the 64-bit 15.5 installation.

% cd $PGI/linux86-64
% ls
16.5/  16.7/  16.9/ 16.10/ 2016/
% chmod -R a+w ./16.5; rm -rf 16.5

To remove a PGI Workstation installation from an OS X platform, simply remove the /opt/PGI directory.

% cd /opt
% rm -rf PGI

To remove Free PGI for OS X, simply drag the icon from the Applications folder to the Trash.

To remove a PGI installation from a Windows platform, use the Control Panel-> Programs and Features facility, and uninstall the PGI product or version in question.


How do I stop the PGI License Service?

To stop the License service on Linux and OS X, locate the lmgrd process and kill it. If the license service is used by other non-PGI products, they will no longer have access as well.

% ps ax | grep lmgrd

 2786 ?        S      0:00 /opt/pgi/linux86-64/16.1/bin/lmgrd -c /opt/pgi/license.dat
18278 pts/0    S+     0:00 grep lmgrd

% kill -9 2786

To stop the license service on a Windows system use Control Panel->Admin Tools->Services->PGI and then right-click on PGI to STOP the service.

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